Alice O'Connor

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The tall one with blue hair | @asponge

Musclecat Showdown controller covers

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That Venus Patrol & Wild Rumpus Party during the Game Developers Conference in March 2014 brought the debut of Musclecat Showdown, a copycat game of jacked cats by artist Natasha Allegri (Adventure Time, Bee and Puppycat) and developer Major Bueno. I made frightfully unpleasant cat-ish covers for its two Xbox 360 controllers out of fake fur, staples, and pink balloons. They were fun and playful, but also importantly made the game less intimidating to partygoers.

Musclecat Showdown sees two cats competing to earn their owners’ love and approval, transforming into terrifyingly ripped humanoid beasts and striking poses like bodybuilders. It’s simply controlled by the thumbsticks on Xbox 360 controllers, with players following directional prompts to copy poses.

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— 6 months ago with 4 notes
#gdc 2014  #The Wild Rumpus  #video games  #controller 
The Wild Rumpus, January 2014

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All photos by Robin Baumgarten

I’m a member of The Wild Rumpus, a London-based group which organises ”indie videogame nighttime roughhousing.” We fill venues with multiplayer video games and music and people and alcohol and competition and friendship and laughter.

Our most recent event in January 2014, for which I was stage manager, saw over 500 people partying in BL-NK in Shoreditch.

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— 8 months ago
Tenya Wanya Teens controllers

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Tenya Wanya Teens is two-player video game of competitive teenage awkwardness, where trying to hit a baseball can unexpectedly result in urinating or rocking out on a guitar. It’s played on custom-designed controllers with two joysticks and 32 colour-changing light-up buttons, and in September 2013, I co-built a new set for The Wild Rumpus.

The game was a collaboration between The Wild Rumpus, Uvula (Katamari Damacy creator Keita Takahashi and composer Asuka Sakai), and Venus Patrol. Given the unusual hardware requirements, it’s obviously intended for events.

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— 11 months ago with 1 note
Make-believe

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All photos by Gemma Thomson

"MAKE-BELIEVE. No really, I’m playing at make-believe," I wrote on an index card, then taped it onto the unconference schedule for GameCamp 6. On reflection, I added "(I also have cardboard boxes.)"

What followed was half an hour of imaginative play which saw an ant princess holding court, tinfoil couture, slow-motion running, and, ultimately, full-scale cardboard warfare against the self-declared ‘Duke of Fuck You.’

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— 1 year ago
I Demand Satisfaction!

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"I demand satisfaction!" I slam my hands on the table and turn furiously towards a sailor. "You, madam, sipped my pint while my head was turned and backwashed!" So begins another round of I Demand Satisfaction!. Within minutes, the blame has been deflected onto a bandito, a cockney urchin, a banker, then a pirate. The offence has grown to someone spitting in my pint, then slapping my mother, calling her a “bawdy tart,” kicking my cat, and breaking my model trains by using them as rollerskates. The bandito is wearing a bowler and a fez stacked atop their sombrero. It’s a fairly typical round.

I created I Demand Satisfaction! at a game jam in February 2012, playtested with the London Indies in pubs, then ran it during two Hide&Seek events that summer at Royal Festival Hall in London’s Southbank Centre.

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— 2 years ago
readme.txt

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I am perhaps the world’s foremost curator of video game mod readme files. Not a collector, no, I ferret out weird and wonderful readme files, the touching and the troubled. Some are of interest because they describe an interesting mod, while others are of note for their prose. My interest is purely textual; I rarely ever look at the actual mods the readme files come with.

Over several years, on and off, I’ve collected my findings on a Tumblr, readme.txt.

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— 2 years ago